Crochet Pattern: Chocolate Covered Strawberries

IMG_6345Pattern writing doesn’t come easily to me, I think mostly because I prefer freestyle crochet and the variants that come of not worrying so much if your stitches are on point. Obviously, for straight items (blankets, squares, etc.) it’s important for stitch counts to match, but in the case of something like a strawberry is really doesn’t matter if you miss or add a stitch – the end result will still look alright.

When it comes to making these strawberries I encourage you to try to make each one different in some way – no two strawberries are the same size or shape, so use this pattern as a guide rather than an exact shape. When you create a tray of them they’ll look more realistic if they are all shaped uniquely.

I’m going to begin by directing you to this handy GUIDE TO CROCHET TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS from The Spruce, this CROCHET GLOSSARY from Free-Crochet.com and this tutorial on how to make and work with the “magic ring” in amigurumi crochet: MAGIC RING BY PLANET JUNE. To make the green leaves it helps to know how to stitch into the back bar of a chain.

Notes about this pattern:

Not each row ends as one might expect — some end with “an extra stitch.” Also some rows start with an increase or decrease seemingly out of place. I try to space my increases and decreases according to the shape I’m intending to create rather than worrying whether or not it follows a specific crochet guideline. I think this creates a more realistic looking result.

Materials:

brown, red, and green yarn in similar weights *Why use art yarn? Sure you can create these using any yarn, but by using a tonal yarn or one with a variant of shades your result will be that much more interesting. To make this pattern I used Malabrigo Rios in Coco, Malabrigo Rios in Ravelry Red, and a green that I’ve lost the tag for but I’m pretty sure was made by Fleece Artist. That’s at least $75 in quality yarn skeins, but so worth it. This is also a great project for leftover bits – and why not make some white chocolate strawberries too! Any yarn will do, it’s entirely up to you.

The crochet hook you use will depend on the weight of your yarn. I like to size down when making amigurumi to help keep my stitches tight – for these strawberries I’m using a worsted weight and a 3.25mm hook (I cheated for the photo and used the pink 3.5mm!…)(..the 3.25 hook is orange and threw off the whole photography thing, hahaha).

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You’ll also need:

a stitch marker

a darning needle

polyfill stuffing

scissors

Chocolate Covered Strawberry Crochet Pattern: 

  1. Begin with a magic ring of four stitches (4)
  2. 2 sc in each (8)
  3. sc in each (8)
  4. 2 sc, sc inc, repeat (10)
  5. 3sc, sc inc, repeat (13)
  6. sc in each (13)
  7. 2sc, sc inc, repeat (17)
  8. sc in each (17)
  9. 3sc, sc inc (with one extra stitch at the end) (21)
  10. sc in each (21)
  11. HDC in each (21)

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  1. SWITCH TO RED, back loop only: sc in each (21)
  2. sc in each (21)

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  1. sc in each (21)
  2. 3sc, 2sctog dec, repeat (one extra stitch at the end) (17) (STUFF YOUR STRAWBERRY)

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  1. 2sc, 2sctog dec, reapeat (one extra stitch at the end) (13)
  2. begin with 2sctog dec, 1sc, repeat (8)
  3. SWITCH TO GREEN *this part of the pattern is variable and should be different with each “leaf” for a more realistic look (I alternate chains of four, five, and 6 for different sized leaves.)* ~ sc, 2sctog dec, ch 6, turn and into the second stitch from the hook hdc into the back bar of the chain, hdc in each back bar, sc into the red, 2sctog dec, chain 5, turn and into the second stitch from the hook hdc into the back bar, sc back into the red, 2sctog dec, chain 6, …repeat this process until you have five leaved on top of your strawberry. I work in those final decrease stitches with the leaves to close the strawberry.

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Finish your strawberry by using the darning needle to fasten off the loose end. Stitch the end through the strawberry to hide it and snip off the end.

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Shop Update

If you were lucky enough to be in my shop a few Saturdays ago when my pipes froze and my bathroom exploded, you might have been even luckier to be one of the ones running to the back to offer help… at which point you would have learned that shop walls hide some horrific messes. For months the space outside the bathroom has served as my recycling pile area (imagine lots of boxes), furniture waiting to be painted area, tool storage area, photography area, boxes of bags area, my family’s kitchen, and my closet.

On my list of a million things to do this week, tidying this area was important.

There were three pieces of furniture to paint and add to the shop: my mother’s table, a clock which was donated to the store, and the base of one of the hutches – the top of which is in use housing the needles, it is on top of a dresser rather than its base because the dresser offers better storage for …more needles.

The base is now beside the checkout counter to gives me some extra storage for bags (Adrienne😂) and shop operations stuff. Now called my little blue sideboard, it is my favourite piece in the shop. (Still needs to be hinged, clearly..)

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ck was donated by some new friends, and I'm not sure how much if its story they would want to share. I think it's safe to say the clock was deeply appreciated by its original owner, but for complicated reasons it hasn't seen love (or the light of day) for years. It is the hope that the clock will find a new life in the shop. I think it already has.

My mother’s table has been in my sunroom for a few years serving as my workshop table. With its leaf it seats six, but Not comfortably. Without the leaf it transforms into an adorable pedestal table, and that is how I’ll use it. It was going to be painted white, and the first coat went on white – in fact the base already had its second coat when I decided to go at it with the blue paint, and I love it. Blue round table it is. We’ll use the round table near the entrance to the shop for a few purposes. I’ve noticed people need more space to put wool down and look at colours, compare, or match. This will be our table for that.

There has been some organisation accomplished this week, but still a lot to go. I’ll be moving on to plan B for the main shelving unit, so please be patient while I make the arrangements. There is no one more eager to see the shelves in place than me.

As for wool…

I’ve been busy coordinating the workshop schedule, and hope to post an updated list to the blog later this weekend. Upcoming classes include: beginner knitting, knit lace making, sock knitting, (hopefully knit fiddlehead mittens), crochet amigurumi cacti, crochet amigurumi mice, needle felt sculpture: chickadees, needle felt sculpture: valentine heart garland, needle felt sculpture: Easter eggs with simple embroidery embellishment.

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orkshops in planning include yoga for stitchers and knitting with an energy healer. (I'm really intrigued by these two!)

Thank you, everyone, for your patience as everything falls into place.