Crochet Easter Egg Pattern

For these simple Easter eggs I used various yarn scraps. Any yarn will do, you can even mix and match scraps into stripes or colour work patterns. Obviously, a sock weight yarn will create a small egg, and an aran weight will create a larger egg. Most of my eggs were made with my go-to worsted weight yarn.

You will need:

  • 4 yards (or so) of yarn scraps
  • A crochet hook appropriate to your yarn (I often use a hook smaller than recommended to ensure a tight stitch, resulting in a solid fabric.)
  • Stitch marker (use your stitch marker to mark stitch number 1 of each round.)
  • A small amount of fibre fill
  • Darning needle

Abbreviations:

magic loop (magic ring, magic circle): Make a loop a few inches from the end of your yarn. Grasp the join of the loop (where the 2 strands of yarn overlap) between your left thumb and forefinger. Insert hook into the loop from front to back. Draw up a loop (also known as a chain [ch 1]). Insert hook into the loop, so you are crocheting over the loop and the yarn tail. Draw up a loop to begin your first sc of Round 1.

yo = yarn over: Yarning over (abbreviated yo) in crochet is the most basic step when making a stitch. Yarning over means wrapping the yarn over your crochet hook. Yarn overs are used before or after you insert the hook into the next stitch, and depending on the stitch you are working, you may yarn over two or more times.

sc = single crochet stitch Insert the hook through stitch space, yarn over and pull through from back to front.

sc inc = single crochet increase stitch Two single crochet stitches into one stitch of the previous round.

sc dec = single crochet decrease stitch Combining two stitches from the previous round into one stitch. Hook through the front loops of the following two stitches, yarn over and pull through both loops of the stitches, yarn over again and pull through the two loops on the hook, continue on to the next stitch.

fasten off = pull the working yarn through the stitch to close the loop to finish the project

Let’s begin!

Begin with a magic circle of 6 sc crochet stitches.

Round 1: sc in each (12)

Round 2: sc, sc inc – repeat (18)

Round 3: 2 sc, sc inc – repeat (24)

Round 4-10: sc in each (24)

Round 11: sc, sc dec – repeat: (18)

Round 12: sc in each (18)

Round 13: sc, sc dec – repeat: (12)

Stuff your egg with a small amount of fibre fill.

Round 14: sc in each (12)

Round 15: sc dec repeat: (6)

Fasten off.

Use a darning needle to stitch the remaining six stitches closed, then thread the yarn end though the egg to hide it, and snip off any remaining yarn end.

Decorative tip: Consider using other yarn scraps to decorate your egg using embroidery techniques.

If you’re interested in an Easter egg pattern that opens up allowing you to hide a small treasure or treat inside, check out my pattern for opening eggs:
https://olivesandbananas.blog/2017/04/17/easter-eggs-crochet-pattern/

Designer’s choice: not all my eggs are the same size – some have an extra round of stitches, others have a row less. The size is often dictated by the amount of yarn I have, and remembering that this is not an exact science, and some variation makes the end result a lot more interesting.

Spring Onion Crochet Pattern

Spring OnionIMG_3403 (2)
Crochet Pattern

For this project you will need:

9 yards of worsted weight yarn in white
(I used Cascade 220 superwash.)

1 yard of worsted weight in light/lime green yarn

48 yards of a soft dk weight yarn in forest green
(I used Diamond Luxury Collection
100% Super Baby Alpaca.)

a pair of 6 or 7 mm safety eyes

a small amount of fibre fill

3.75mm crochet hook

a darning needle

a stitch marker

Optional: some rustic jute twine to tie around your onion in a bow for decoration
– or to tie a bunch together.

Let’s Begin!IMG_3409 (1)

For the white part of the onion:
Begin with a magic circle of 6 single crochet stitches

Round 1: 2 sc in each (12)

Round 2: 1 sc, sc inc (repeat) (18)

Round 3: 2 sc, sc inc (repeat) (24)

Rounds 4-6: sc in each (24)

Round 7: sc, sc dec (repeat) (18)

Round 8: sc in each (18)

Place the safety eyes between rows 5 and 6
approximately 6 or seven stitches apart.

Round 9: sc, sc dec (12)

Round 10: sc in each (12)

SWITCH COLOUR TO LIGHT/LIME GREEN

Round 11: sc in each (12)

Round 12: sc in each (12)

Fasten off leaving an end long enough to sew to the green stalks.

Stuff your onion with a small amount of fibre fill.

To make the white roots for your onion:
Use your leftover white yarn, and with your darning
needle thread through the bottom where the magic
circle comes together. Stitch six or eight times leaving
two inch long loops. Snip the ends of the loops, then
untwine the ply of the yarn to create the squiggles.

Green StalksIMG_9499

To make the stalks stitch approximately 70 rounds in total slowly increasing from six stitches to ten.
There is no exact process of increasing, in fact by using a different count for each stalk, your onion will look more realistic. Your green onion stalks should measure between 8.5 and 10 inches when finished.

Fasten off two of the stalks, leaving a longer end on the third for sewing together.

Make three:

Magic circle of 3 sc crochet stitches

Round 1: 2 sc in each (6)

Rounds 2-9: sc in each (6)

Round 10: add one sc to this round anywhere (7)

Rounds 11-25: sc in each (7)

Round 26: add one sc anywhere (8)

Rounds 27-40: sc in each (8)

Round 41: add one sc anywhere (9)

Rounds 42-58: sc in each (9)

Round 59: add one sc anywhere (10)

Rounds: 60-70: sc in each (10)

To attach the green stalks to the white onion:

First, fasten off two of the green stalks, leaving the third with aIMG_3407 (1)long end for sewing.

Sewing just in the centre of the three stalks,
stitch the stalks together either using a slip stitch with your crochet hook or by using the darning needle.

Continue to stitch them together in the centre until you have approximately 12 stitches
around outside of the three stalks.

Use the light/lime green to sew the white onion to the green stalks, placing two stitches into each stitch.

Decorate your onion with a small piece of jute twine wrapped around a few times
then tied into a bow.

IMG_9501 (1)
ENJOY YOUR ONION!

Download the FREE PDF here:

Spring Onion Crochet Pattern

Crochet Pattern: Chocolate Covered Strawberries

IMG_6345Pattern writing doesn’t come easily to me, I think mostly because I prefer freestyle crochet and the variants that come of not worrying so much if your stitches are on point. Obviously, for straight items (blankets, squares, etc.) it’s important for stitch counts to match, but in the case of something like a strawberry is really doesn’t matter if you miss or add a stitch – the end result will still look alright.

When it comes to making these strawberries I encourage you to try to make each one different in some way – no two strawberries are the same size or shape, so use this pattern as a guide rather than an exact shape. When you create a tray of them they’ll look more realistic if they are all shaped uniquely.

I’m going to begin by directing you to this handy GUIDE TO CROCHET TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS from The Spruce, this CROCHET GLOSSARY from Free-Crochet.com and this tutorial on how to make and work with the “magic ring” in amigurumi crochet: MAGIC RING BY PLANET JUNE. To make the green leaves it helps to know how to stitch into the back bar of a chain.

Notes about this pattern:

Not each row ends as one might expect — some end with “an extra stitch.” Also some rows start with an increase or decrease seemingly out of place. I try to space my increases and decreases according to the shape I’m intending to create rather than worrying whether or not it follows a specific crochet guideline. I think this creates a more realistic looking result.

Materials:

brown, red, and green yarn in similar weights *Why use art yarn? Sure you can create these using any yarn, but by using a tonal yarn or one with a variant of shades your result will be that much more interesting. To make this pattern I used Malabrigo Rios in Coco, Malabrigo Rios in Ravelry Red, and a green that I’ve lost the tag for but I’m pretty sure was made by Fleece Artist. That’s at least $75 in quality yarn skeins, but so worth it. This is also a great project for leftover bits – and why not make some white chocolate strawberries too! Any yarn will do, it’s entirely up to you.

The crochet hook you use will depend on the weight of your yarn. I like to size down when making amigurumi to help keep my stitches tight – for these strawberries I’m using a worsted weight and a 3.25mm hook (I cheated for the photo and used the pink 3.5mm!…)(..the 3.25 hook is orange and threw off the whole photography thing, hahaha).

IMG_6346

You’ll also need:

a stitch marker

a darning needle

polyfill stuffing

scissors

Chocolate Covered Strawberry Crochet Pattern: 

  1. Begin with a magic ring of four stitches (4)
  2. 2 sc in each (8)
  3. sc in each (8)
  4. 2 sc, sc inc, repeat (10)
  5. 3sc, sc inc, repeat (13)
  6. sc in each (13)
  7. 2sc, sc inc, repeat (17)
  8. sc in each (17)
  9. 3sc, sc inc (with one extra stitch at the end) (21)
  10. sc in each (21)
  11. HDC in each (21)

IMG_6348

  1. SWITCH TO RED, back loop only: sc in each (21)
  2. sc in each (21)

IMG_6349

  1. sc in each (21)
  2. 3sc, 2sctog dec, repeat (one extra stitch at the end) (17) (STUFF YOUR STRAWBERRY)

IMG_6351

  1. 2sc, 2sctog dec, reapeat (one extra stitch at the end) (13)
  2. begin with 2sctog dec, 1sc, repeat (8)
  3. SWITCH TO GREEN *this part of the pattern is variable and should be different with each “leaf” for a more realistic look (I alternate chains of four, five, and 6 for different sized leaves.)* ~ sc, 2sctog dec, ch 6, turn and into the second stitch from the hook hdc into the back bar of the chain, hdc in each back bar, sc into the red, 2sctog dec, chain 5, turn and into the second stitch from the hook hdc into the back bar, sc back into the red, 2sctog dec, chain 6, …repeat this process until you have five leaved on top of your strawberry. I work in those final decrease stitches with the leaves to close the strawberry.

IMG_6352

Finish your strawberry by using the darning needle to fasten off the loose end. Stitch the end through the strawberry to hide it and snip off the end.

IMG_6353