Shooting Stars crochet pattern

 

IMG_6314I recently revealed the most ridiculous thing I’ve ever made. This dissected unicorn made for Colleen and her daughter has been getting a lot of love over Facebook and I’ve had countless requests for the pattern.

The unicorn can be stuffed with all his parts and buttoned closed. Inside a unicorn we find rainbows and shooting stars, a big rainbow heart and perfectly pink lungs, sparkling intestine and a gumdrop stomach, kidneys the colour of the sea and a liver that sparkles (because unicorns only drink champagne). His bum is filled with rainbow poop.

I wish I could write the whole pattern now, but there just isn’t the time. In the meantime I hope a little shooting star will keep you all believing.

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Follow the link below to a FREE pdf pattern for the unicorn’s shooting stars:

SHOOTINGSTARS_crochetpatternbyOlivesandBananas

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Enjoy!

Easter Eggs Crochet Pattern

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These cute little Easter eggs are simple to make and fun for little ones’ fingers to fill and hide. This pattern makes an egg a little larger than a real chicken egg (size depends on your wool and hook size), and could be filled with anything your imagination can come up with. Little needle felted characters are an adorable addition – and someday I may find time to write an addendum to this pattern with instructions for those, but for now this egg pattern is an easy addition to Easter craft ideas, so I’m jotting it down to share with you all (even if Easter is over). 🙂

I used Bernat Satin 3.5 oz worsted in ‘Star Dust’ and an F hook (3.75mm). Your yarn and hook size will determine you finished product size. You’ll need a darning needle, stitch marker, and a pair of scissors.IMG_4009

Crochet Egg Pattern:

Begin with a magic circle of six.

Round 1: 2 sc in each = 12

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Round 2: sc, 2sctog inc, rep = 18

Round 3: 2 sc, 2sctog inc, rep = 24

Round 4: 3 sc, 2sctog inc, rep = 30

Rounds 5 – 8: sc in each = 30

Round 9: 3 sc, 2 sttog dec, rep = 24IMG_3997 (1)

Round 10: sc in each = 24

Round 11: sc in first six stitches, chain 19, connect with stitch 1 of 24 with a single crochet stich (beginning round 12.

Round 12: sc in each = 24 (when stitching into the 18 stitches of the chain, use the front loop only -flo- )

Round 13: 3 sc, 2 sttog dec, rep = 18

Round 14: sc in in each = 18

Round 15: 2 sc, 2 sttog dec, rep = 12

Round 16: sc in each = 12

Round 17: sc, 2 sttog dec, rep until youève got six stitches left in the round

Close using your darning needle to close the last six stitched, gently pulling it closed with each stitch. Bring the yarn through to the inside of your egg and secure with a hidden knot (or use a felting needle to secure the end).

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My Hannah Bunny

img_4560This little bunny was built by eye, there are no stitch counts just rough numbers and rows. I know people really rely on patterns and stitch numbers, but I believe that in amigurumi being a stitch or two off doesn’t make that much of a difference. When shaping bodies you should feel free to make your shape as plump or thin as you want. If you understand increasing and decreasing in the round this should be easy.

I wasn’t thinking of writing this pattern while I was making it, so my notes are rough, and I didn’t take photos along the way, so please bear with this “pattern.”

My finished bunny is about 11 inches tall. This yarn is a sport/light weight and I used a D hook to help give you reference.

The head and body are made starting with a magic circle of eight.(I find starting with eight gives the shape a flat-round appearance, while when starting with six make a more true round shape.)

The body:

Magic circle 8

row1: 2sctog in each stitch 16img_4790

row2: sc, 2sctog

row2: 2 sc, 2sctog

row3: 3 sc, 2sctog

row4: 4 sc, 2sctog

row5: sc in each

row6: 5 sc, 2sctog

rows 7-18: sc in each

rows 19: 5 sc, 2st decerease

rows 20-23: sc in each

rows 23-34: slowly decrease every other row (starting every two rows, maybe three) to form the body -I didn’t count my stitches or follow the same decrease pattern – some decrease rows I only decreased every five or six stitches, and I wasn’t really following rows anymore – just stitch along to shape a body. My neck ends with about 14 stitches.

I find I work a lot faster without a stitch marker or worrying too much about rows. I concentrate more on shaping the body the way I like for each individual project rather than trying too hard to be exact.
The head:img_4794

Magic circle 8

row1: 2sctog in each stitch 16
row2: sc, 2sctog

row2: 2 sc, 2sctog

row3: 3 sc, 2sctog

rows 4-10: sc in each

row11: 3 sc, 2st decrease

Now is a good time to place your safety eyes. Position them somewhere around row 7 eight stitches apart (the placement really is entirely up to your judgement.) I stitched the nose in after the head was finished using pink yarn and a darning needle criss crossed over six stitches between the eyes. I thread the ends into the form then gently felt the yarn in place to keep it secure.

row12: 2 sc, 2st decrease

row 13: 1 sc, 2st decrease

Stuff your head.

Close the rest using either a darning needle or slip stitches.

The ears, arms, and legs all begin with a magic circle of six.

Ears:

Magic circle 6

row1: sc in each 12img_4789

row2: sc, 2sctog 18

row3: 2 sc, 2sctog

row4: 3 sc, 2sctog

rows 5-7: sc in each

row8: 3 sc, 2st decrease

rows 9-34: sc in each

(I think I decreased somewhere along the way to make them about 20 stitches around in the end.)

To finish the ears I cut a piece of pale pink felt to size and used a 42 gauge felting needle to gently felt it into place. This works beautifully with natural fibres. (Acrylic yarn might need some stitches.)

I didn’t take photos of the head before I attached the hat, so I can’t show you the attachment of the ears (but I should note that I stitched the hat on using a light thread, so the hat can be removed without damaging the bunny.

The ears are attached by using the leftover end to sew it together then in place. Pinch the ear to give it a fold, sew the fold together – then sew the ear to the head at the back side along row 2.

Arms:img_4788

Magic circle 6

row1: sc in each 12

row2: sc, 2sctog 18

row3: 2 sc, 2sctog

row4: 3 sc, 2sctog

rows 5-8: sc in each

(somewhere around now, stuff the hand using a small amount of batting.)

rows 9-13: decrease using one st decrease stitch

rows 13-20: sc in each
Legs:img_4792

Magic circle 6

row1: sc in each 12

row2: sc, 2sctog 18

row3: 2 sc, 2sctog

row4: 3 sc, 2sctog

row5: hdc in each (this gives your foot a bit of a flat appearance.)

row6: sc in each to two loops of row 5

rows 7-9 sc in each

row 10: 2 sc, 2 st decrease

rows 11-20: sc in each

Stuff the foot using a small amount of batting.

When decreasing the foot you can put all your decrease stitches one right after another then continue with sc for the rest of the row – this will define a toe and heel of the foot. OR you can distribute the decrease stitches evenly (3 sc, 2st decrease) for the row to create a round foot. Either works.. in the case of this Hannah bunny I distributed them evenly.

Tail:

I used a bright white chunkier yarn and made a small ball:img_4787

Magic circle 6

row1: sc in each 12

row2: sc, 2sctog 18

row3: 2 sc, 2sctog

row4: sc in each

row5: 2 sc, 2st decrease

row6: 1 sc, 2st decrease

row7: 2st decrease until closed, leave a long end for sewing it to the body.

TIP: when attaching, I always felt the area lightly with a super fine gauge felting needle. This secures the fibres and holds everything in place.

To make her Pussy Hat simply start with a chain big enough to fit your bunny’s head. Close it with a slip stitch careful not to twist it. Rows of HDC follow, each being closed with a slip stitch until you’ve reached your desired size. Close it with slip stitches across the top. Done. Attach it to your bunny’s head using thread and straight stitches to easily remove it if you want later on.

Why Pigs?

img_7476I’m not sure how to explain this without making my mother sound like a crazy person, so I hope I tell this story in a way she would approve. She was always my best editor; an art history professor by day, she was also an effective, eloquent writer, widely published, an architectural historian, and respected researcher. She was my best teacher.

I miss her. She died in May of 2013 when breast cancer became more than her body could fight.

I think she would really love what I’m doing here; not just the fibre art creations but the process and how I’m combining my skills and interests in literature, horticulture, writing, photography, and fibre to make it happen. Her influence is everywhere – art and art history, her eye for perspective, her books, her prints, her pigs…

Her pigs, you say? Yes, her pigs.

This isn’t a story about a collection of pigs or a hidden closet of pig paraphernalia, it’s really a story about just one pig and a few others. It began one Christmas when I was old enough to know that Santa was really my mom; that year my father gave my mother some money and said, “go buy yourself a sweater.” as her Christmas gift. (Which makes him sound sort of terrible, but to all of our surprise every year he came out of nowhere with some extravagant gift for her – img_3063usually a hard to get editon of some art book she really wanted. He did the same every birthday and mother’s day too.) That year she took the sweater money and came home with this pig.

I’m not sure where she got it, and it has no inscription but she was thrilled with her pig and my father was completely confused. I don’t believe he was truly mad, but he was certainly unimpressed. A sweater was a practical gift and he saw no practical use for this pig. I don’t think he ever really understood that her pleasure came not just from the pig, but his reaction to the pig. When she knew she was dying she brought my sister and I together to divide her belongings. The process went smoother than in a lot of families I know, I think because my sister and I are such completely opposite people that we were drawn to completely different things. This pig was one of the first things my mother gave me.

Also in her funny collection of folk art were some quirky flying creatures – a frog and a cow  who hung in her kitchen for many years. (I’ll come back to cows soon – with a felting project, my mother, and Joe Fafard.) A flying pig would seem like an appropriate fit, but she didn’t have one of those. I know that my felted flying pigs would make her smile.

I suppose, for me, the flying pig represents an impossibility (an adorable impossibility). Everything about my life feels like an impossibility now, but I’m still living it; I just can’t believe I breathe without my son. It’s sad living without my mother, but losing your parents is meant to be an inevitability in life; it’s supposed to happen in that order. Life without Finn is blanketed in a different kind of grief. Something feels wrong every minute of every day, something is missing – that panic feeling you feel when you wonder where your child is, a little pit in my gut that never goes away. I can wish that my parents were here to meet Oliver and to admire Hannah, and imagine it happily, but when I wish and imagine Finn here it hurts and I see ghosts in places he should be.

When I was first learning to felt a flying pig was one of the first things I thought of, though I didn’t actually create one until last year. My first self written crochet amigurumi pattern however was a flying pig (someday I’ll translate that to a readable pattern, but for now even I don’t understand what I wrote). I do believe a part of my imagination lives in an impossible place now – thankfully it comes out in the form of ridiculously cute felted sculptures and tiny crocheted creatures.

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Hi, my name is Joe. (and the teeny tiny pig)

As I write the instructions for the flying pig needle felting kits I was joined by a few more of my mother’s pigs. Well, these guys were my find and first love, which I brought home from Australia one summer to live with my mother. I sent her a text from Australia the day I found Joe with his photo and that lovey eyed emoji to which she responded the same. I can still hear her silly giggle in my memory. Joe and the teeny tiny pig were found at a garden centre in Wentworth Falls, NSW (a little west of Sydney in the mountains) and carried home with care. (Which, by the way, Australian garden centres aren’t much different than Canadian garden centres except the seasons are backward and perennials and annuals are all mixed up. It’s pretty fun actually – like being in Wonderland… or  uh, Oz..)  My late mother-in-law did not understand the attraction to the pigs, but I do recall the faintest glimmer of a smile when she looked at Joe. Pigs, who doesn’t love them?flyingpigpng

“The time has come,” the Walrus said,
“To talk of many things:
Of shoes-and ships-and sealing-wax-
Of cabbages-and kings-
And why the sea is boiling hot-
And whether pigs have wings.”
Through the Looking Glass
Lewis Carroll

garden blogger to wool blogger

For years I kept a garden blog. It was something I worked hard on but never took too seriously, purposely. The point was to document my gardens and horticultural interests, and somehow keep a record of my adventures in gardening. I did, and it’s wonderful, and I hope to someday get back to writing it all down. It would be a shame to not have a record of how my garden has developed at our new house.., which we’ve now been in three and a half years, long enough for a lot of gardening to have happened. It’s just that so much else has happened that I don’t know where to begin, or catch my breath sometimes, so writing it just hasn’t happened.

I purposely left my garden blog stopped where it is. I like that photo of Adam holding the bees a lot. We were in the Roots to Harvest backyard beekeeper course, and those downtown bees were fueling up around the Cornwall garden site, and charming us all. I was pregnant with Oliver at the time, and it was the last time I felt truly consumed by gardening. (Well, other than the autumn of 2015 when I planted over 600 bulbs in my garden.) I’ve worked on our beds since, but it’s going to be a while before they’ll make sense to anyone but me. In the meantime I’m using my #amysgardentbay hashtag on Instagram photos to track the little garden moments.img_2667

My horticultural adventures understandably appear in my fibre art work, whether needle felting or crochet I’m always inspired by my garden. The colours of the wool look like a garden to me, and throughout the seasons I felt and hook what I’m growing (or eating).

As with photographing my garden, I find immense enjoyment and forever changing challenges in the photography of crafting. It intrigues me not just personally but also technologically, and from a marketing perspective. My photography browsing is now often spent admiring how creators capture their work.

I love the combination of my garden and my wool. The textures of nature matched with the colours makes for endless hours of creative heartwork. When my friend Sheri was teaching me to crochet she described how her addiction isn’t just to the making of things but to the feeling of the yarn in her hands – the “buttery softness” as she says. This is so true – to many from my understanding, the healing in #craftastherapy is found most in the texture, the softness, and comfort of wool. It’s not that different than the power of garden therapy, the texture of the soil, plants, and scents. I have to say my house never smelled better than the day I unpacked a shipment of merino wool in my sunny dining room – in a way is smelled like there was a herd of sheep in the house, ..but nicely washed sheep.

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even my winter garden inspires

My hope is that this blog will become as personally valuable a record of the evolution of Olives and Bananas, as my garden blog is to the evolution of “amy’s garden” and when I compare to the records I’ve blogged, drawn, and scribbled about my garden over the years, I see so much of the process is the same. Keeping a journal of the journey.