Crochet Easter Egg Pattern

For these simple Easter eggs I used various yarn scraps. Any yarn will do, you can even mix and match scraps into stripes or colour work patterns. Obviously, a sock weight yarn will create a small egg, and an aran weight will create a larger egg. Most of my eggs were made with my go-to worsted weight yarn.

You will need:

  • 4 yards (or so) of yarn scraps
  • A crochet hook appropriate to your yarn (I often use a hook smaller than recommended to ensure a tight stitch, resulting in a solid fabric.)
  • Stitch marker (use your stitch marker to mark stitch number 1 of each round.)
  • A small amount of fibre fill
  • Darning needle

Abbreviations:

magic loop (magic ring, magic circle): Make a loop a few inches from the end of your yarn. Grasp the join of the loop (where the 2 strands of yarn overlap) between your left thumb and forefinger. Insert hook into the loop from front to back. Draw up a loop (also known as a chain [ch 1]). Insert hook into the loop, so you are crocheting over the loop and the yarn tail. Draw up a loop to begin your first sc of Round 1.

yo = yarn over: Yarning over (abbreviated yo) in crochet is the most basic step when making a stitch. Yarning over means wrapping the yarn over your crochet hook. Yarn overs are used before or after you insert the hook into the next stitch, and depending on the stitch you are working, you may yarn over two or more times.

sc = single crochet stitch Insert the hook through stitch space, yarn over and pull through from back to front.

sc inc = single crochet increase stitch Two single crochet stitches into one stitch of the previous round.

sc dec = single crochet decrease stitch Combining two stitches from the previous round into one stitch. Hook through the front loops of the following two stitches, yarn over and pull through both loops of the stitches, yarn over again and pull through the two loops on the hook, continue on to the next stitch.

fasten off = pull the working yarn through the stitch to close the loop to finish the project

Let’s begin!

Begin with a magic circle of 6 sc crochet stitches.

Round 1: sc in each (12)

Round 2: sc, sc inc – repeat (18)

Round 3: 2 sc, sc inc – repeat (24)

Round 4-10: sc in each (24)

Round 11: sc, sc dec – repeat: (18)

Round 12: sc in each (18)

Round 13: sc, sc dec – repeat: (12)

Stuff your egg with a small amount of fibre fill.

Round 14: sc in each (12)

Round 15: sc dec repeat: (6)

Fasten off.

Use a darning needle to stitch the remaining six stitches closed, then thread the yarn end though the egg to hide it, and snip off any remaining yarn end.

Decorative tip: Consider using other yarn scraps to decorate your egg using embroidery techniques.

If you’re interested in an Easter egg pattern that opens up allowing you to hide a small treasure or treat inside, check out my pattern for opening eggs:
https://olivesandbananas.blog/2017/04/17/easter-eggs-crochet-pattern/

Designer’s choice: not all my eggs are the same size – some have an extra round of stitches, others have a row less. The size is often dictated by the amount of yarn I have, and remembering that this is not an exact science, and some variation makes the end result a lot more interesting.

Spring Onion Crochet Pattern

Spring OnionIMG_3403 (2)
Crochet Pattern

For this project you will need:

9 yards of worsted weight yarn in white
(I used Cascade 220 superwash.)

1 yard of worsted weight in light/lime green yarn

48 yards of a soft dk weight yarn in forest green
(I used Diamond Luxury Collection
100% Super Baby Alpaca.)

a pair of 6 or 7 mm safety eyes

a small amount of fibre fill

3.75mm crochet hook

a darning needle

a stitch marker

Optional: some rustic jute twine to tie around your onion in a bow for decoration
– or to tie a bunch together.

Let’s Begin!IMG_3409 (1)

For the white part of the onion:
Begin with a magic circle of 6 single crochet stitches

Round 1: 2 sc in each (12)

Round 2: 1 sc, sc inc (repeat) (18)

Round 3: 2 sc, sc inc (repeat) (24)

Rounds 4-6: sc in each (24)

Round 7: sc, sc dec (repeat) (18)

Round 8: sc in each (18)

Place the safety eyes between rows 5 and 6
approximately 6 or seven stitches apart.

Round 9: sc, sc dec (12)

Round 10: sc in each (12)

SWITCH COLOUR TO LIGHT/LIME GREEN

Round 11: sc in each (12)

Round 12: sc in each (12)

Fasten off leaving an end long enough to sew to the green stalks.

Stuff your onion with a small amount of fibre fill.

To make the white roots for your onion:
Use your leftover white yarn, and with your darning
needle thread through the bottom where the magic
circle comes together. Stitch six or eight times leaving
two inch long loops. Snip the ends of the loops, then
untwine the ply of the yarn to create the squiggles.

Green StalksIMG_9499

To make the stalks stitch approximately 70 rounds in total slowly increasing from six stitches to ten.
There is no exact process of increasing, in fact by using a different count for each stalk, your onion will look more realistic. Your green onion stalks should measure between 8.5 and 10 inches when finished.

Fasten off two of the stalks, leaving a longer end on the third for sewing together.

Make three:

Magic circle of 3 sc crochet stitches

Round 1: 2 sc in each (6)

Rounds 2-9: sc in each (6)

Round 10: add one sc to this round anywhere (7)

Rounds 11-25: sc in each (7)

Round 26: add one sc anywhere (8)

Rounds 27-40: sc in each (8)

Round 41: add one sc anywhere (9)

Rounds 42-58: sc in each (9)

Round 59: add one sc anywhere (10)

Rounds: 60-70: sc in each (10)

To attach the green stalks to the white onion:

First, fasten off two of the green stalks, leaving the third with aIMG_3407 (1)long end for sewing.

Sewing just in the centre of the three stalks,
stitch the stalks together either using a slip stitch with your crochet hook or by using the darning needle.

Continue to stitch them together in the centre until you have approximately 12 stitches
around outside of the three stalks.

Use the light/lime green to sew the white onion to the green stalks, placing two stitches into each stitch.

Decorate your onion with a small piece of jute twine wrapped around a few times
then tied into a bow.

IMG_9501 (1)
ENJOY YOUR ONION!

Download the FREE PDF here:

Spring Onion Crochet Pattern

My Hannah Bunny

img_4560This little bunny was built by eye, there are no stitch counts just rough numbers and rows. I know people really rely on patterns and stitch numbers, but I believe that in amigurumi being a stitch or two off doesn’t make that much of a difference. When shaping bodies you should feel free to make your shape as plump or thin as you want. If you understand increasing and decreasing in the round this should be easy.

I wasn’t thinking of writing this pattern while I was making it, so my notes are rough, and I didn’t take photos along the way, so please bear with this “pattern.”

My finished bunny is about 11 inches tall. This yarn is a sport/light weight and I used a D hook to help give you reference.

The head and body are made starting with a magic circle of eight.(I find starting with eight gives the shape a flat-round appearance, while when starting with six make a more true round shape.)

The body:

Magic circle 8

row1: 2sctog in each stitch 16img_4790

row2: sc, 2sctog

row2: 2 sc, 2sctog

row3: 3 sc, 2sctog

row4: 4 sc, 2sctog

row5: sc in each

row6: 5 sc, 2sctog

rows 7-18: sc in each

rows 19: 5 sc, 2st decerease

rows 20-23: sc in each

rows 23-34: slowly decrease every other row (starting every two rows, maybe three) to form the body -I didn’t count my stitches or follow the same decrease pattern – some decrease rows I only decreased every five or six stitches, and I wasn’t really following rows anymore – just stitch along to shape a body. My neck ends with about 14 stitches.

I find I work a lot faster without a stitch marker or worrying too much about rows. I concentrate more on shaping the body the way I like for each individual project rather than trying too hard to be exact.
The head:img_4794

Magic circle 8

row1: 2sctog in each stitch 16
row2: sc, 2sctog

row2: 2 sc, 2sctog

row3: 3 sc, 2sctog

rows 4-10: sc in each

row11: 3 sc, 2st decrease

Now is a good time to place your safety eyes. Position them somewhere around row 7 eight stitches apart (the placement really is entirely up to your judgement.) I stitched the nose in after the head was finished using pink yarn and a darning needle criss crossed over six stitches between the eyes. I thread the ends into the form then gently felt the yarn in place to keep it secure.

row12: 2 sc, 2st decrease

row 13: 1 sc, 2st decrease

Stuff your head.

Close the rest using either a darning needle or slip stitches.

The ears, arms, and legs all begin with a magic circle of six.

Ears:

Magic circle 6

row1: sc in each 12img_4789

row2: sc, 2sctog 18

row3: 2 sc, 2sctog

row4: 3 sc, 2sctog

rows 5-7: sc in each

row8: 3 sc, 2st decrease

rows 9-34: sc in each

(I think I decreased somewhere along the way to make them about 20 stitches around in the end.)

To finish the ears I cut a piece of pale pink felt to size and used a 42 gauge felting needle to gently felt it into place. This works beautifully with natural fibres. (Acrylic yarn might need some stitches.)

I didn’t take photos of the head before I attached the hat, so I can’t show you the attachment of the ears (but I should note that I stitched the hat on using a light thread, so the hat can be removed without damaging the bunny.

The ears are attached by using the leftover end to sew it together then in place. Pinch the ear to give it a fold, sew the fold together – then sew the ear to the head at the back side along row 2.

Arms:img_4788

Magic circle 6

row1: sc in each 12

row2: sc, 2sctog 18

row3: 2 sc, 2sctog

row4: 3 sc, 2sctog

rows 5-8: sc in each

(somewhere around now, stuff the hand using a small amount of batting.)

rows 9-13: decrease using one st decrease stitch

rows 13-20: sc in each
Legs:img_4792

Magic circle 6

row1: sc in each 12

row2: sc, 2sctog 18

row3: 2 sc, 2sctog

row4: 3 sc, 2sctog

row5: hdc in each (this gives your foot a bit of a flat appearance.)

row6: sc in each to two loops of row 5

rows 7-9 sc in each

row 10: 2 sc, 2 st decrease

rows 11-20: sc in each

Stuff the foot using a small amount of batting.

When decreasing the foot you can put all your decrease stitches one right after another then continue with sc for the rest of the row – this will define a toe and heel of the foot. OR you can distribute the decrease stitches evenly (3 sc, 2st decrease) for the row to create a round foot. Either works.. in the case of this Hannah bunny I distributed them evenly.

Tail:

I used a bright white chunkier yarn and made a small ball:img_4787

Magic circle 6

row1: sc in each 12

row2: sc, 2sctog 18

row3: 2 sc, 2sctog

row4: sc in each

row5: 2 sc, 2st decrease

row6: 1 sc, 2st decrease

row7: 2st decrease until closed, leave a long end for sewing it to the body.

TIP: when attaching, I always felt the area lightly with a super fine gauge felting needle. This secures the fibres and holds everything in place.

To make her Pussy Hat simply start with a chain big enough to fit your bunny’s head. Close it with a slip stitch careful not to twist it. Rows of HDC follow, each being closed with a slip stitch until you’ve reached your desired size. Close it with slip stitches across the top. Done. Attach it to your bunny’s head using thread and straight stitches to easily remove it if you want later on.