Shop Update

If you were lucky enough to be in my shop a few Saturdays ago when my pipes froze and my bathroom exploded, you might have been even luckier to be one of the ones running to the back to offer help… at which point you would have learned that shop walls hide some horrific messes. For months the space outside the bathroom has served as my recycling pile area (imagine lots of boxes), furniture waiting to be painted area, tool storage area, photography area, boxes of bags area, my family’s kitchen, and my closet.

On my list of a million things to do this week, tidying this area was important.

There were three pieces of furniture to paint and add to the shop: my mother’s table, a clock which was donated to the store, and the base of one of the hutches – the top of which is in use housing the needles, it is on top of a dresser rather than its base because the dresser offers better storage for …more needles.

The base is now beside the checkout counter to gives me some extra storage for bags (Adrienne😂) and shop operations stuff. Now called my little blue sideboard, it is my favourite piece in the shop. (Still needs to be hinged, clearly..)

ck was donated by some new friends, and I'm not sure how much if its story they would want to share. I think it's safe to say the clock was deeply appreciated by its original owner, but for complicated reasons it hasn't seen love (or the light of day) for years. It is the hope that the clock will find a new life in the shop. I think it already has.

My mother’s table has been in my sunroom for a few years serving as my workshop table. With its leaf it seats six, but Not comfortably. Without the leaf it transforms into an adorable pedestal table, and that is how I’ll use it. It was going to be painted white, and the first coat went on white – in fact the base already had its second coat when I decided to go at it with the blue paint, and I love it. Blue round table it is. We’ll use the round table near the entrance to the shop for a few purposes. I’ve noticed people need more space to put wool down and look at colours, compare, or match. This will be our table for that.

There has been some organisation accomplished this week, but still a lot to go. I’ll be moving on to plan B for the main shelving unit, so please be patient while I make the arrangements. There is no one more eager to see the shelves in place than me.

As for wool…

I’ve been busy coordinating the workshop schedule, and hope to post an updated list to the blog later this weekend. Upcoming classes include: beginner knitting, knit lace making, sock knitting, (hopefully knit fiddlehead mittens), crochet amigurumi cacti, crochet amigurumi mice, needle felt sculpture: chickadees, needle felt sculpture: valentine heart garland, needle felt sculpture: Easter eggs with simple embroidery embellishment.

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orkshops in planning include yoga for stitchers and knitting with an energy healer. (I'm really intrigued by these two!)

Thank you, everyone, for your patience as everything falls into place.

Easter Eggs Crochet Pattern


These cute little Easter eggs are simple to make and fun for little ones’ fingers to fill and hide. This pattern makes an egg a little larger than a real chicken egg (size depends on your wool and hook size), and could be filled with anything your imagination can come up with. Little needle felted characters are an adorable addition – and someday I may find time to write an addendum to this pattern with instructions for those, but for now this egg pattern is an easy addition to Easter craft ideas, so I’m jotting it down to share with you all (even if Easter is over). 🙂

I used Bernat Satin 3.5 oz worsted in ‘Star Dust’ and an F hook (3.75mm). Your yarn and hook size will determine you finished product size. You’ll need a darning needle, stitch marker, and a pair of scissors.IMG_4009

Crochet Egg Pattern:

Begin with a magic circle of six.

Round 1: 2 sc in each = 12

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Round 2: sc, 2sctog inc, rep = 18

Round 3: 2 sc, 2sctog inc, rep = 24

Round 4: 3 sc, 2sctog inc, rep = 30

Rounds 5 – 8: sc in each = 30

Round 9: 3 sc, 2 sttog dec, rep = 24IMG_3997 (1)

Round 10: sc in each = 24

Round 11: sc in first six stitches, chain 19, connect with stitch 1 of 24 with a single crochet stich (beginning round 12.

Round 12: sc in each = 24 (when stitching into the 18 stitches of the chain, use the front loop only -flo- )

Round 13: 3 sc, 2 sttog dec, rep = 18

Round 14: sc in in each = 18

Round 15: 2 sc, 2 sttog dec, rep = 12

Round 16: sc in each = 12

Round 17: sc, 2 sttog dec, rep until youève got six stitches left in the round

Close using your darning needle to close the last six stitched, gently pulling it closed with each stitch. Bring the yarn through to the inside of your egg and secure with a hidden knot (or use a felting needle to secure the end).



A Felted Garden

In May I will offering a couple of needle felting workshops while my tulip garden is in full bloom. A couple years ago I planted over 600 bulbs in the garden beds surrounding our house. They bloomed spectacularly last year and I’m anxiously hoping for a repeat this year.


In Finn’s garden ‘White Clouds’ tulips give way to ‘Blue Amiable’ then to giant purple alliums with Mother of Thyme blanketing the bed. Under my oak tree (a tree I often focus on when taking time to breathe and visualize during yoga) a rainbow of tulips circles the trunk in mixed varieties of blue, purple, pink, red, orange, apricot and yellow – some tall and slim, others short and full, with delicate lily flowering ones too.

A bold patch of tall orange tulips stand at a south-east corner of a bed that surrounds the house, with four different purple tulips varieties in groups near the doors. (My mother would be very disapproving of the number of purple flowers in my garden.) My favourite patch of tulips is a yellow/pink lily flowering sweetheart called ‘Elegant Lady’ that I have planted on the south side of our house near Oliver’s playset.

For years I’ve loved photographing my garden and playing around with macro lenses and light. I didn’t think I could find anything better to photograph – or blog about- until I discovered wool. Better yet: gardens and wool together. The complimentary colours and textures come together so well in every photo, each inspiring me to make something or plant something. It’s all beautiful to work with – whether it’s with my hands and needles or with a lens.

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I’m feeling somewhat determined to felt one of each of my tulips so that I’ll have a complete set forever. Tulips are a simple felting project, though creating a thin, smooth petal takes time and a little patience. I wrap armature wire in wool for the stem, and blend shades of green wool for the leaves.

While I’m felting my tulips it will be fun to share my enthusiasm for tulip gardening and felting with others. There’s no reason to stop at tulips either. I hope to felt all kinds of flowers this year as they bloom in #amysgardentbay. IMG_8638

I’ll be creating Facebook events for the two following dates, so stay tuned there for more information!

Needle Felted Tulips (and other flowers)
Two dates to choose from:

Thursday, May 18



Sunday, May 21

12:00noon – 4:00pm

We will tour my tulip garden and use the blooms as inspiration as we felt petals and leaves in the sunroom overlooking the garden.

You’ll be provided with a kit including a foam work surface, a variety pack of felting needles with a bonus extra fine needle for delicate work, and leather finger protectors. You’ll receive two ounces of 21.5 micron super fine merino wool to create a bouquet to blooms with. Our work table will have lots of extra wool to experiment with, different fibres, beads, and thread to embellish your blooms if you wish.

To register, contact me by email or by Facebook or Instagram message.



Dragonfly Tales


The book pictured is A Dazzle of Dragonflies by Forrest Lee Mitchell and James L. Lasswell. It’s an enchanting view into the world of dragonflies from an imaginative perspective.

There’s a dragonfly commision coming up that means a lot to me. Each custom order has had it’s poignant effect, and I feel privileged with the confidence and whole heartedness people share their stories. The upcoming dragonfly will in part bring some healing to breast cancer patients, and I can’t help but feel my mother strongly, imagining her holding my little Finn wherever they are, as I bring this project together.

On September 30th 2012 my husband and I travelled the north western shore of Lake Superior visiting artist’s studios as part of the Crossing Borders Art Tour. While at Betsy Bowen’s studio in my favourite escape Grand Marais, I bought this little print of dragonflies which were an illustration for the book Hawk’s Ridge. At the time I didn’t know what I would do with the green darner dragonflies, but the drawing captured a piece of my heart so I knew immediately this would be special.

One year later was the first day of my life without Finn. When I started decorating his nursery earlier that year, these dragonflies were the first thing I put in the room.

The drawing has always made me smile. It’s musical, playful, and elegant just as dragonflies are. Just think about the number of people who associate dragonflies with something magical or profound in their life, to me that says these widely adored insects do possess a connection to something mysterious and lovely.

Betsy Bowen’s green darner dragonflies


Also coming up is another infant elf hat using Dauntless Dragonfly from Expression Fibre Arts. Not only is this yarn stunning and soft, it’s named so appropriately, and is also the shades of my favourite Oliver baby blanket from Aunty Helen, Uncle Patric, and cousins Alex and Phoebe. It will be decorated in needlefelted dragonflies in a colour and number chosen by the buyer. I believe strongly in the ways we relate to symbols.

Some time ago I edited a photo I took of a dragonfly that Hannah rescued at Little Dog Lake one day when we were swimming with the dogs. It rested on her hand long enough for me to take a number of photos of it and it was beautiful. I won’t link the quote because I’m not sure the full text is really in context, at the time (when I was reading random leads to all things dragonfly) this particular quote sunk in deeply and still resonates.


‘Hannah’s dragonfly’ 2010